• Before diagnosis
  • Diagnosed with psoriasis
  • Seeing a dermatologist
  • Severe psoriasis
  • Staying well on therapy

MY JOURNEY

Your psoriasis journey result

These are the personal opinions and experiences of the individuals filmed. Please note that people may respond differently to treatments and all treatments may have side effects. Your doctor will determine which treatment is most suitable for you. For further information or if you have any concerns, please speak with your doctor.

Renaye

Dr Peter Foley MBBS, BMed, MD, FACD

You may have begun to notice reoccurring flaky thick rashes that appear on certain areas of your skin. They’re not attractive, can be itchy and red, and might make you feel self-conscious. Perhaps you may have attributed these to your washing powder or even the weather. But something isn’t right. You may have tried some lotions or creams from the chemist, with no effect. The frustration sets in that it’s out of your control and after you notice it’s been a while and the rash isn’t going away, you consider seeking help from a GP.

Who to turn to and what to say

Rather than letting the problem continue, it’s best to seek help as soon as you can. With psoriasis, no lesion is too small to treat. Your GP will have access to some treatments and can refer you to specialists (dermatologists) that have access to a wider range of treatments for psoriasis. For some people, just learning what the lesion is and that it is due to an illness of the immune system, not just a skin problem, can be an empowering step. The next step is to find out as much as you can about psoriasis and treatments so that you can help your doctor to help you take back control of how your skin looks. Make sure you check out the What is psoriasis section and download the information guide on Communicating with your GP to help you ask all the right questions. For some people, their psoriasis may need treatments that act below the skin, which are only available from a dermatologist. In this case, your GP needs to give you a referral to a dermatologist.

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MY JOURNEY

Your psoriasis journey result

These are the personal opinions and experiences of the individuals filmed. Please note that people may respond differently to treatments and all treatments may have side effects. Your doctor will determine which treatment is most suitable for you. For further information or if you have any concerns, please speak with your doctor.

Jill

Dr Peter Foley MBBS, BMed, MD, FACD

The appearance of your skin and reactions of others can make you feel self conscious about your appearance, and can start to affect your self esteem. The escalation of symptoms can evoke feelings of despair, embarrassment, worry and frustration. But don’t worry; many people with psoriasis go through the same frustrations. At this stage you’re ready to seek help. You see your GP who takes a look at the lesions on your skin, and may ask some questions about how it’s been making you feel and how it is affecting your day-to-day life in general. When they diagnose you with psoriasis they may explain a little bit about what it is and how they can prescribe treatments to tackle the skin condition you see. So it’s understandable that you may think the key to treating your psoriasis is only for lesions you can see. For some people with mild psoriasis, this may be sufficient, however, psoriasis is more than just a skin condition. Beyond the outer layers of skin, it’s actually caused by an over-active immune system that mistakenly targets your normal, healthy skin cells, causing them to grow faster than normal. While there are a number of treatments available that tackle psoriasis from the inside out (called systemics), they can only be prescribed by dermatologists. So your GP will need to refer you to one for access to these treatments. If you and your GP have tried some topical treatments and they didn't work, you may wish to ask for a referral to a dermatologist who has access to a wider range of treatment options. Download the Communicating with your dermatologist information guide to help you talk with your GP about aspects of your psoriasis and which treatments are right for you.

Treatments


Although there currently isn’t a cure for psoriasis, there are treatments that can help to manage it. Psoriasis treatments aim to reduce your psoriasis symptoms, such as removing scales and smoothing the skin, or to slow the overproduction of skin cells. What works for one person may not work for another and your skin may become resistant to certain psoriasis treatments over time. That’s why it’s important to know the different treatment options and to work with your GP or dermatologist to find the psoriasis treatment that is right for you.
Topical treatments

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MY JOURNEY

Your psoriasis journey result

These are the personal opinions and experiences of the individuals filmed. Please note that people may respond differently to treatments and all treatments may have side effects. Your doctor will determine which treatment is most suitable for you. For further information or if you have any concerns, please speak with your doctor.

Peter

Dr Peter Foley MBBS, BMed, MD, FACD

When you are referred to a dermatologist, you may feel a sense of hope that there is more that can be done. For some, this may be the first time they hear that their psoriasis is more than a skin condition, and that it’s actually caused by an underlying, over-active immune system that mistakenly affects healthy skin cells. This can be a moment of empowerment and fear. Realising that you have a chronic condition may be hard to accept, but understanding there are ways to live with and treat psoriasis may be helpful. At first, some dermatologists may cycle you through some of the same treatments your GP has already tried, and this can feel frustrating. After the topical treatments have been tried, you may move on to your first systemic treatment to tackle the condition from the inside out. As your dermatologist will have explained, systemic treatments tackle the condition from within. On one hand it feels refreshing to have a new option that may tackle the problem at it’s source, yet the list of side effects you may read about these treatments can be daunting. You may try different treatment options that work well for a while, giving you back a life that’s flare-free, taking you to new highs. But for some it may be temporary as not all treatments work for everyone, and the continuing pattern of flares and clearance can bring on a feeling of hopelessness. If you’ve tried several treatments, the process can feel like an emotional rollercoaster. Some people internalise their feelings and withdraw from situations that make them feel uncomfortable. It’s important you have a dermatologist you feel comfortable with to discuss how your psoriasis and treatments make you feel. Don’t be afraid to speak up when you’re feeling frustration or despair – how psoriasis affects your life is an important measure for treatment success. If you don’t communicate how you are feeling, your dermatologist may not know. For some, it takes a move to a different dermatologist, whom they feel more comfortable with to be offered different treatment options. However, it’s important to know that some treatments are only available after others fail first, and will depend on the severity of your psoriasis, which is a combination of how much of your body is affected and how it impacts your life. You should talk to your dermatologist about what treatment options are suitable for you. Download the Communicating with your dermatologist information guide to help you talk with your GP about aspects of your psoriasis and which treatments are right for you.

Treatments


Although there currently isn’t a cure for psoriasis, there are treatments that can help to manage it. As you may know, psoriasis treatments aim to reduce your psoriasis symptoms, such as removing scales and smoothing the skin, or to slow the overproduction of skin cells. What works for one person may not work for another and your skin may become resistant to certain psoriasis treatments over time. That’s why it’s important to know the different treatment options and to work with your GP or dermatologist to find the psoriasis treatment that is right for you.
Topical treatments

Light therapy

Systemic treatments

Biologic treatments

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MY JOURNEY

Your psoriasis journey result

These are the personal opinions and experiences of the individuals filmed. Please note that people may respond differently to treatments and all treatments may have side effects. Your doctor will determine which treatment is most suitable for you. For further information or if you have any concerns, please speak with your doctor. 

Josh

Dr Peter Foley MBBS, BMed, MD, FACD

If you have tried and failed many options, it can be hard to find hope by the time you’re offered a biologic. You may have mentioned to your doctor that you’re missing work or unable to do things you want to because of your psoriasis, and this may have initiated the conversation about biologic therapy. So why a biologic now, and not earlier? As you will be aware by now, psoriasis is more than a skin condition. It’s actually caused by an underlying, over-active immune system that mistakenly affects healthy skin cells. Biologic treatments have been designed to target specific parts of the immune system. As a result, these treatments are reserved for patients with the more severe forms of psoriasis, where other treatments have not worked. To be eligible for a biologic therapy at a price subsidised by the government, you have to fit certain criteria, which is why your dermatologist may not have mentioned it as an option earlier. They carry out the necessary evaluation, and if you are eligible, will discuss the process, the benefits and side effects of treatment. You will likely do your own research as well and you may have concerns about the cost, potential side effects, that they are injected and what your options are if this doesn't work out. All of these fears and questions are not uncommon, and are shared by many patients facing these treatments. It may be of comfort to remember that for most of the biologic treatments available, they are used not only for psoriasis, but also for other autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. So there are many patients around Australia and across the world that have experienced these therapies. Understanding as much as you can and asking your dermatologist questions will help you to make the right decision for you. Check out the biologic treatments section for more information. You can also download the Communicating with your dermatologist information guide to help you talk about your psoriasis and treatments. When you start a biologic and your symptoms become under control, you’ll likely continue to worry that the flares will come back as they have in the past. After all, that’s what you’ve faced up until now. It can also take a while to settle into the routine of the injection. But after a while, there is an increasing tendency to get back into the things you have been missing out on.

Treatments


Although there currently isn’t a cure for psoriasis, there are treatments that can help to manage it. As you may know, psoriasis treatments aim to reduce your psoriasis symptoms, such as removing scales and smoothing the skin, or to slow the overproduction of skin cells. What works for one person may not work for another and your skin may become resistant to certain psoriasis treatments over time. That’s why it’s important to know the different treatment options and to work with your GP or dermatologist to find the psoriasis treatment that is right for you. Biologic treatments

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MY JOURNEY

Your psoriasis journey result

These are the personal opinions and experiences of the individuals filmed. Please note that people may respond differently to treatments and all treatments may have side effects. Your doctor will determine which treatment is most suitable for you. For further information or if you have any concerns, please speak with your doctor.

Carmen

Dr Peter Foley MBBS, BMed, MD, FACD

If you have been well for some time, you may question whether you still need to take your treatment or save it for when it’s needed. But it is important to keep using your treatment, even when you feel well. Remember, treatments do not cure psoriasis, and if you stop using your treatment you may experience a flare-up. You should ask your dermatologist if you are unsure how long you are likely to be on therapy and how your treatment is progressing. Download the Communicating with your dermatologist information guide to help you talk about the aspects of your psoriasis and treatments. 

Treatments


Although there currently isn’t a cure for psoriasis, there are treatments that can help to manage it. As you may know, psoriasis treatments aim to reduce your psoriasis symptoms, such as removing scales and smoothing the skin, or to slow the overproduction of skin cells. What works for one person may not work for another and your skin may become resistant to certain psoriasis treatments over time. That’s why it’s important to know the different treatment options and to work with your GP or dermatologist to find the psoriasis treatment that is right for you.
Topical treatments

Light therapy

Systemic treatments

Biologic treatments

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